Hearing Loss Treatment Center

Treat hearing loss before it's too late.

Hearing loss affects up to 48 million Americans, according to the Center for Hearing and Communication. If the world around you has become muffled or unclear, Echo Hearing Systems & Audiology, Inc. may have a hearing loss treatment that helps with your condition.

 

 Wellness-Campaign-Infographic1-AB

 

 

 Wellness-Campaign-Infographic2-AB

 

 

 Wellness-Campaign-Infographic3-AB

 

Types of Hearing Loss

Patients may experience four different types of hearing loss, including the following:
- Conductive hearing loss. This occurs from damage or blockage to the middle and/or outer ear, resulting in poor sound conduction to the eardrum or inner ear. Causes may include a perforated    eardrum, buildup of fluid or earwax, or abnormal ear bone growth.
- Sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss occurs when hair cells in the cochlea become damaged or malfunction. Although permanent, technology is available that may help reduce its effects.
- Auditory neuropathy. This type of hearing loss occurs when there’s a problem with the auditory nerve that transmits signals from the cochlea to the brain. It can be caused by neurological conditions or by problems at birth. With auditory neuropathy, levels of hearing loss may fluctuate from mild to severe, although solutions are available to help reduce its effects.
- Mixed hearing loss. This occurs when both sensorineural and conductive hearing loss are present.

Causes of Hearing Loss

There are several causes of hearing loss, many of which can be treated. Extremely loud noises, like explosions, can cause sudden changes in hearing. But even gradual exposure to loud noises can cause hearing problems over time. Sometimes changes are caused by diseases, such as otosclerosis or Ménière's disease, which affect the middle and inner ears, respectively. Autoimmune disorders, tumors, certain medications, and even traumatic head injuries may lead to ear problems. Sometimes, in a condition called presbycusis, hearing loss simply comes with age, with those affected experiencing unclear, muffled sounds as they get older. Regardless of the cause, hearing loss can have a devastating effect on your life.

How Hearing Loss Can Impact Your Life

Untreated hearing loss can affect many of the things you love to do, such as enjoying your favorite music and participating in your favorite recreational activities. Just dining out at a busy restaurant can become problematic when all the noise around you drowns out the conversation with your loved ones. This can impact both your physical and emotional well-being and may cause you to feel lonely, stressed, isolated, or depressed. When the things you used to enjoy become difficult, it’s time to take a hearing test.

Hearing Loss Treatments

Depending on your type of hearing loss, an audiologist may be able to help. In some cases, removing the buildup of earwax may be all you need. In other cases, such as those involving bones or ear drum abnormalities, surgery or tubes may be necessary. For other people, hearing aids can offer clear, amplified sound to help you get back to living your life.

If you have trouble hearing or processing what’s going on around you, Echo Hearing Systems & Audiology, Inc. may be able to help. We’ll test your hearing to determine the root cause, then connect you with the hearing loss treatment option that’s best for you. Contact us online or call us today at (614) 457-5848 to learn more.

 

SOURCES:
1http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/ hearing_loss_accelerates_brain_function_decline_in_older_adults | 2http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/hearing_loss_and_dementia_linked_in_study | 3http://www.hopkinsmedicine.
org/news/media/releases/ hearing_loss_linked_to_accelerated_brain_tissue_loss_ | 4http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/ hearing_loss_accelerates_brain_function_decline_in_older_adults | 5Amieva, H., Ouvrard, C., Giulioli, C., Meillon C.,
Rullier, L., & Dartigues, J. F. (2015). Self-reported hearing loss, hearing aids, and cognitive decline in elderly adults: A 25-year study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Oct;63 (10):2099-104. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13649.